DRUG FACTS

This is your A - Z guide of common Drugs of Abuse. We are constantly striving to educate our clients as well as ourselves and to make sure that you have the most up to date information. Please call us with any questions or concerns you may have, we are always here to assist.
EtG - Alcohol

                   

What is Alcohol ?

Alcohol is one of the most used and abused, yet widely accepted, drug of abuse being one of the oldest consumed substances around the world. People from all over the world use alcohol for many different reason but one of the main uses of alcohol is drinking it. It is important to know that not all alcohol is drinking alcohol. Drinking alcohol, also called ethanol or ethyl alcohol, is produced by the fermentation of fruits, grains, or other sources of sugar and depending on this process will dictate the strength, or alcohol content, of a beverage. When alcohol is consumed your body will start to metabolize it producing what is called Ethyl Glucuronide (ETG), a metabolite of ethanol. Since ETG is a metabolite produced by the body after consumption you are able to detect positive trace amounts within a persons urine up to 80 hours from a person last drink, making it a desirable choice for alcohol screen testing.

 

Cut-Off Level (ng/mL) Window of Detection
300, 500, 1000 ng/mL (Urine) Up to 80 hrs.
< 50, 50, 100ng/mL (Saliva) n/a

 

 

How is it Used ?

Alcohol is used in a variety of different ways but most commonly known, drinking alcohol, or ethanol, is usually injested orally by consuming an alcoholic beverage. There has been cases where addicts have been know to consume other alcoholic products such as, mouth wash, cleaning products, medicines containing trace amounts of alcohol, and even rubbing alcohol, which can be very harmful or even fatal.

 

What Does it Look Like ?

Ethanol, or drinking alcohol, comes in liquid form and can varry in color, ranging from clear to dark brown and amber, as well as potency.

What are the Effects?

Side effects will vary based on the rate and amount of consumption as well as the potency and alcohol content of a drink. Effects can appear as early as 10 minutes. Your blood alcohol concentration (BAC) level, which is the amount alcohol present in a persons bloodstream, will rise as someone continues to drink and will increase the strength of any side effects. Heavy drinking and binge drinking, where someone consumes multiple drinks over and extended period of time, can lead to blackouts in memory where the user will often not remember his or her actions while under the influence. Prolonged alcohol consumption-can have adverse side effects on someones, brain, heart, liver, pancreas, and immune system and has even been known to increase risks of developing, mouth, throat, and liver cancer. 

Alcohol is a highly addictive substance and can cause dependency with extreme withdrawal symptoms after stopping use. Alcohol Use Disorder (AUD) is a very serious illness that many people suffer form everyday. Some signs of AUD are…

  • Had times when you ended up drinking more, or longer than you intended?

  • More than once wanted to cut down or stop drinking, or tried to, but couldn’t?
  • Spent a lot of time drinking? Or being sick or getting over the aftereffects?
  • Experienced craving — a strong need, or urge, to drink?
  • Found that drinking — or being sick from drinking — often interfered with taking care of your home or family? Or caused job troubles? Or school problems?
  • Continued to drink even though it was causing trouble with your family or friends?
  • Given up or cut back on activities that were important or interesting to you, or gave you pleasure, in order to drink?
  • More than once gotten into situations while or after drinking that increased your chances of getting hurt (such as driving, swimming, using machinery, walking in a dangerous area, or having unsafe sex)?
  • Continued to drink even though it was making you feel depressed or anxious or adding to another health problem? Or after having had a memory blackout?
  • Had to drink much more than you once did to get the effect you want? Or found that your usual number of drinks had much less effect than before?
  • Found that when the effects of alcohol were wearing off, you had withdrawal symptoms, such as trouble sleeping, shakiness, irritability, anxiety, depression, restlessness, nausea, or sweating? Or sensed things that were not there?

 

Common Symptoms

  • Reduced inhibitions
  • Slurred speech
  • Motor impairment
  • Confusion
  • Memory problems
  • Concentration problems
  • Coma
  • Breathing problems
  • Death

 

Legal Status

Alcohol is legal to purchase and consume in most parts of the world with some age restrictions. Currently the legal drinking age in the United States is 21.

AMP - Amphetimine

What is Amphetamine?

Amphetamines are stimulants that speed up the body’s system. Many are legally prescribed and used to treat attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Amphetamine was first marketed in the 1930s as Benzedrine® in an over-the-counter inhaler to treat nasal congestion. By 1937 amphetamine was available by prescription in tablet form and was used in the treatment of the sleeping disorder, narcolepsy, and ADHD. Over the years, the use and abuse of clandestinely produced amphetamines have spread. Today, clandestine laboratory production of amphetamines has mushroomed, and the abuse of the drug has

 

Cut-Off Levels Detection Window
300, 500, 1000 ng/ml (Urine) From 2-5 hrs after use up to 2-4 days
50 ng/mL (Saliva) 1 - 3 Days

 

Common Nicknames

Crank, Ice, Speed, Uppers

What does it Look Like?

Amphetamines can look like pills or powder. Common prescription amphetamines include methylphenidate (Ritalin® or Ritalin SR®), amphetamine and dextroamphetamine (Adderall®), and dextroamphetamine (Dexedrine®).

How is it Used?

Amphetamines are generally taken orally or injected. However, the addition of “ice,” the slang name of crystallized methamphetamine hydrochloride, has promoted smoking as another mode of administration. Just as “crack” is smokable cocaine, “ice” is smokable methamphetamine.

What are the Effects?

The effects of amphetamines and methamphetamine are similar to cocaine, but their onset is slower and their duration is longer. In contrast to cocaine, which is quickly removed from the brain and is almost completely metabolized, methamphetamine remains in the central nervous system longer, and a larger percentage of the drug remains unchanged in the body, producing prolonged stimulant effects. Chronic abuse produces a psychosis that resembles schizophrenia and is characterized by: Paranoia, picking at the skin, preoccupation with one’s own thoughts, and auditory and visual hallucinations. Violent and erratic behavior is frequently seen among chronic abusers of amphetamines and methamphetamine. Drugs that cause similar effects include: dexmethylphendiate, phentermine, benzphetamine, phendimetrazine, cocaine, crack, methamphetamine, and khat.

Common Symptoms

Physical effects of amphetamine use include increased blood pressure and pulse rates, insomnia, loss of appetite, and physical exhaustion.

Overdose effects include agitation, increased body temperature, hallucinations, convulsions, and possible death.

Legal Status 

Amphetamines are Schedule II stimulants, which means that they have a high potential for abuse and limited medical

uses. Pharmaceutical products are available only through a prescription that cannot be refilled.

 

BAR - Barbiturate

Image result for Barbiturate

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What are Barbiturates?

Barbiturates are depressants that produce a wide spectrum of central nervous system depression from mild sedation to coma.

Barbiturates are depressants that produce a wide spectrum of central nervous system depression from mild sedation to coma. They have also been used as sedatives, hypnotics, anesthetics, and anticonvulsants. Barbiturates are classified as Ultrashort, Short, Intermediate, Long-acting.

Barbiturates were first introduced for medical use in the 1900s, and today about 12 substances are in medical use.

Cut- Off Levels Window of Detection 
200, 300 ng/mL (Urine) 2hr. - 3 Days (Urine)
50, 300 ng/mL (Saliva)  1 - 2 Days (Saliva)

 

Common Nicknames

Barbs, Block Busters, Christmas Trees, Goof Balls, Pinks, Red Devils, Reds & Blues, Yellow Jackets

What does it Look Like?

Barbiturates come in a variety of multicolored pills and tablets. Abusers prefer the short-acting and intermediate barbiturates such as Amytal® and Seconal®.

How is it Used?

Barbiturates are abused by swallowing a pill or injecting a liquid form. Barbiturates are generally abused to reduce anxiety, decrease inhibitions, and treat unwanted effects of illicit drugs. Barbiturates can be extremely dangerous because overdoses can occur easily and lead to death.

What are the Effects?

Barbiturates cause mild euphoria, lack of inhibition, relief of anxiety and sleepiness. Higher doses cause impairment of memory, judgment and coordination, irritability, and paranoid and suicidal ideation. Tolerance develops quickly and larger doses are then needed to produce the same effect, increasing the danger of an overdose. Barbiturates slow down the central nervous system and cause sleepiness.

Drugs with similar effects include alcohol, benzodiazepines like Valium® and Xanax®, tranquilizers, sleeping pills, Rohypnol®, and GHB.

Common Symptoms

Effects of overdose include shallow respiration, clammy skin, dilated pupils, weak and rapid pulse, coma, and possible death.

Legal Status

Barbiturates are Schedule II, III, and IV depressants under the Controlled Substances Act. Barbiturates were first introduced for medical use in the 1900s, and today about 12 substances are in medical use.

MDPV - Bath Salts

What are Bath Salts?

Synthetic stimulants that are marketed as “bath salts” are often found in a number of retail products. These synthetic stimulants are chemicals. The chemicals are synthetic derivatives of cathinone, a central nervous system stimulant, which is an active chemical found naturally in the khat plant. Mephedrone and MDPV (3-4 methylene- which is an active chemical found naturally in the khat plant. Many of dioxypyrovalerone) are two of the designer cathinones most commonly found in these “bath salt” products. Many of these products are sold over the Internet, in convenience stores, and in head shops.” 

Common Nicknames

Bilss, Blue Silk, Cloud Nine, Drone, Energy-1, Ivory Wave, Lunar Wave, Meow Meow, Ocean Burst, Pure Ivory, Purple Wave, Red Dove, Snow Leopard, Stardust, Vanilla Sky, White Dove, White Knight, White Lightening 

What Does it Look Like?

“Bath salt” stimulant products are sold in powder form in small plastic or foil packages of 200 and 500 milligrams under various brand names. Mephedrone is a fine white, off-white, or slightly yellow-colored powder. It can also be found in tablet and capsule form. MDPV is a fine white or off-white powder.

How it’s Used?

“Bath salts” are usually ingested by sniffing/snorting. They can also be taken orally, smoked, or put into a solution and injected.

What are the Effects?

People who abuse these substances have reported agitation, insomnia, irritability, dizziness, depression, paranoia, delusions, suicidal thoughts, seizures, and panic attacks. Users have also reported effects including impaired perception of reality, reduced motor control, and decreased ability to think clearly. 

Cathinone derivatives act as central nervous system stimulants causing rapid heart rate (which may lead to heart attacks and strokes), chest pains, nosebleeds, sweating, nausea, and vomiting. Drugs that have similar effects include: amphetamines, cocaine, Khat, LSD, and MDMA.These substances are usually marketed with the warning “not intended for human consumption.” Any time that users put uncontrolled or unregulated substances into their bodies, the effects are unknown and can be dangerous. 

Legal status in the United States 

On Friday, October 21, 2011, DEA published a final order in the Federal Register exercising its emergency scheduling authority to control three synthetic stimulants that are used to make bath salts, including: Mephedrone, 3,4 methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV) and Methylone. Except as authorized by law, this action makes possessing and selling these chemicals, or the products that contain them, illegal in the United States. This emergency action was selling these chemicals, or the products that contain them, illegal in the United States. This emergency action was necessary to prevent an imminent threat to the public safety. The temporary scheduling action will remain in effect for at least one year while the DEA and the United States Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) further study whether these chemicals should be permanently controlled. As a result of this order, these synthetic stimulants are designated as Schedule I substances under the Controlled Substances Act.

BZO - Benzodiazepine
What is Benzodiazepine?

Benzodiazepines are  prescription only central nervous system depressants used to treat anxiety, insomnia, muscle spasms, and seizures. They can cause sedation and hypnosis. 

How is it Used?

Benzodiazepine can only be obtained, legally, with a prescription from a licensed medical practitioner and is most often given in tablet form to be taken orally. The drug has gained popularity in recreational use and where users will sometimes crush the tablet to be insufflated nasally, injected, or inhaled when burned.

What does it Look Like?

Benzodiazepine comes in tablet form in a variety of shapes and colors. Some popular brand names include Xanax, Ativan and Kolonpin.

What are the Effects?

Benzodiazepines suppress the central nervous system causing sever drowsiness and sleepiness. Amnesia and spouts of memory lapse are common among users and these effects are increased with larger doses. 

Common Symptoms

  • Drowsiness
  • Sleepiness 
  • Amnesia 
  • Irratiblilty
  • Vidid Dreams
  • Shallow Respiration
  • Dialated Pupils
  • Week and Rapid Pulse
  • Coma
  • Death

Common Nicknames

Benzos, Zannies, Zanny Bars, Bars, Dozers,  Mind Erasers

Legal Status

Schedule III Controlled Substance

BUP - Buprenorphine
What is Buprenorphine?

Buprenorphine, combined with naloxone, is in a drug class of opioid partial-agonist antagonist, meaning it has less efficacy, or lesser effects, by the way it binds to the opioid receptors in the brain. Commercially known by the brand Suboxone, Buprenorphine is prescribed to treat people with opioid addiction by a way of weening someone off a much stronger opioid like Heroin or Oxycodone. Buprenorphine can lessen the withdrawal symptoms that come with the stoppage of use with opioids and is often tested to make sure that a patient is taking the prescribe dosage.

 

Cut-Off Levels Window of Detection
5, 10 ng/mL (Urine) 1 - 3 Days (Urine)
5, 10 ng/mL (Saliva) 1 - 2 Days (Saliva)

 

How is it Used?

Buprenorphine comes in a sublingual tablet and sublingual film to be placed under the tongue and dissolved as well as a buccal film which is place between the cheek and gums.

What does it Look Like?

Small rectangular pieces of film, like a breath strip, usually orange or yellow in color.

What are the Effects?

When taken as prescribed Buprenophine can lessen withdrawl symptoms that are seen in people addicted to opioids when they stop using. If taken in high dosages in can produce similar effects of other much more powerful opioids.

Common Symptoms

  • headache
  • stomach pain
  • constipation
  • difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep
  • mouth numbness or redness
  • tongue pain
  • blurred vision
  • back pain

Common Nicknames

Subs, Bups, Bupies

Legal Status

Buprenorphine is a Schedule II substance under the U.S. Controlled Substance Act.

COC - Cocaine
What is Cocaine ?

Cocaine is a powerful stimulant that derives from coca leaves native to South America. The common form of cocaine is produced through a series of chemical processes involving very harmful substances with the end result being illegally distributed through out the world. Cocaine has been used in it’s earliest days as medical remedy and has now become one of the most popular among recreational drug users due to the intense euphoric effects. It has short lasting rapid on set effects that can appear within 10 minutes after use and last any where from 30 minutes to an hour.

 

How is it Used ?

Cocaine can be crushed into powder and insufflated nasally, mixed with water and injected, or smoked and is often mixed with other drugs like opioids, known as speedballing. Due to it’s highly additive properties the potential for abuse and repetitive use is common among users.

 

What does it Look Like ?

White powdery substance.

 

What are the Effects ?

Depending on it is taken the effects of cocaine can vary. When injected users  describe a “rush” of euphoria with  short lasting rapid on set effects where as when cocaine is insufflated or inhaled the “rush” is much lesser and on set effects can take within 10-15 minutes to occur. The short lasting stimulant effects of cocaine lead to frequent and habitual use. Other effects such as erratic behavior, anxiety and paranoia have been associated with the use of cocaine.

 

Common Symptoms

  • constricted blood vessels
  • dilated pupils
  • nausea
  • raised body temperature and blood pressure
  • faster heartbeat
  • tremors and muscle twitches
  • restlessness
  • extreme happiness and energy
  • mental alertness
  • hypersensitivity to sight, sound, and touch
  • irritability
  • paranoia—extreme and unreasonable distrust of others

 

Common Nicknames

Blow, Snow, Ski, White, Crack, Rock

Legal Status

Cocaine is a Scheduled II substance under U.S. Controlled Substance Act. Cocaine solutions can be used in a medical to reduce bleeding in the mouth, throat and mucus membranes although is rarely uses as there are much better options for such purposes. 

FYN - Fentanyl

What is Fentanyl?

Fentanyl is a powerful synthetic opioid analgesic that is similar to morphine but is 50 to 100 times more potent.1,2 It is a schedule II prescription drug,3 and it is typically used to treat patients with severe pain or to manage pain after surgery.4 It is also sometimes used to treat patients with chronic pain who are physically tolerant to other opioids.5 In its prescription form, fentanyl is known by such names as Actiq®, Duragesic®, and Sublimaze®.5,6 Street names for fentanyl or for fentanyl-laced heroin include Apache, China Girl, China White, Dance Fever, Friend, Goodfella, Jackpot, Murder 8, TNT, and Tango and Cash.

 

Cut-Off Levels Detection Window
200 ng/ml Up to 3 days

 

How do people use fentanyl?

When prescribed by a physician, fentanyl is often administered via injection, transdermal patch, or in lozenges.6 However, the fentanyl and fentanyl analogs associated with recent overdoses are produced in clandestine laboratories.7 This non-pharmaceutical fentanyl is sold in the following forms: as a powder; spiked on blotter paper; mixed with or substituted for heroin; or as tablets that mimic other, less potent opioids.8 People can swallow, snort, or inject fentanyl, or they can put blotter paper in their mouths so that fentanyl is absorbed through the mucous membrane.

 

How does fentanyl affect the brain?

Like heroin, morphine, and other opioid drugs, fentanyl works by binding to the body’s opioid receptors, which are found in areas of the brain that control pain and emotions.9 When opioid drugs bind to these receptors, they can drive up dopamine levels in the brain’s reward areas, producing a state of euphoria and relaxation.9 Fentanyl’s effects resemble those of heroin and include euphoria, drowsiness, nausea, confusion, constipation, sedation, tolerance, addiction, respiratory depression and arrest, unconsciousness, coma, and death.

GAB - Gabapentin
What is an Gabapentin?

Gabapentin, better know by the brand name Neurontin, is an anti-convulsant prescription medication used to treat a variety of symptoms including seizures, nerve pain, and restless leg syndrome. When Gabapentin is taken more than the prescribed amount or mixed with other drugs such as alcohol, anti-anxiety medications, muscle relaxants, or Opioids it can produce euphoric side effects which can lead to abuse. Since Gabapentin is not a scheduled controlled substance and is used to treat such a wide variety of ailments it has become over prescribed adding to the potential for abuse.

 

How is it Used?

Gabapentin comes in a tablet, capsule, and oral solution. Recently there has been increased popularity among recreational users and is often mixed with other drugs such as, alcohol, Xanax, or opioids to produce the desired euphoric effects. 

 

What does it Look Like?

Small oval tablets or oblong capsules varying in color.

 

What are the Effects?

Gabapentin is prescribed to treat a variety of different ailments from restless leg syndrome, to neuropathic nerve pain, and seizures. When taken in large doses and especially when mixed with other drugs, eurphic effects comparable to opioids have been reported leading to the recent rise in recreational use and abuse.

 

Common Symptoms

  • Double vision
  • Slurred Speech
  • Lack of coordination
  • Unusual eye movement
  • Dizziness
  • Drowsiness 

 

Common Nicknames

Johnny’s, Gabby’s, Gab

 

Legal Status

Currently available with a prescription from a professional medical practitioner. 

GHB
What is GHB?

Gamma-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) or, sodium oxybate, is a central nervous system depressant, also widely known as the  “date-rape” drug and, under approval of strict DEA and FDA protocol can be prescribed medically to treat narcolepsy and a medical condition called cataplexy.  The drug gained popularity for recreational use during the 1990’s as a club drug among ravers and is considered to have a high potential for abuse due to the eurphoric effects it can produce.  Some GHB analogues, such as gamma-butyrlactone and 1,4-Butanediol, or GBL and BD, are available legally for industrial use in the production of polyurethane, pesticides, elastic fibers, pharmaceuticals, metal and plastic coatings among a variety of the products. GHB analogues are also sold illicitly for steroidal purposes like muscle growth for body building, fat loss, baldness reversal, and anti-aging. 

 

How is it Used?

Commonly sold in liquid or powder form, GHB is usually consumed orally by either drinking the liquid or dissolving the powder into a drink.

What does it Look Like?

GHB comes in a clear orderless liquid, or white powder.

 

What are the Effects?

The onset effects of GHB usually take around 15-30 minutes to appear and can last anywhere from 4-6 hours. Given it’s central nervous system depressant effects users can experience euphoric 

 

Common Symptoms

  • Euphoria
  • Drowsiness
  • Decreased Anxiety
  • Confusion
  • Memory Impairment
  • GHB analogues are known to produce side effects such as:
  • Skin Irritation
  • Eye Irritation
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Incontinence
  • Unconsciousness
  • Seizures
  • Liver Damage
  • Kidney Failure
  • Respiratory Depression
  • Death 

 

Common Nicknames

  • Easy Lay
  • G
  • Georgia Home Boy
  • GHB
  • Goop
  • Grievous Bodily Harm
  • Liquid Ecstasy 
  • Liquid X
  • Scoop

 

Legal Status

GHB is classifies under the controlled substance act of the United States of America as a scheduled I controlled substance. This means that GHB is considered to have a high potential of dependence and abuse and currently has no medical use. However, under certain strict protocols and approval from DEA and FDA, there are some GHB products that are schedule III controlled substances and can be obtained for medical use with a prescription from a medical practitioner.  

6-MAM - Heroin
What is Heroin?

Heroin is an opioid processed from the naturally occurring opiate morphine. Like all opioids, Heroin, is highly addictive both psychologically and psychically due to the fast acting eurphic effects that it causes in users. Heroin is one of the most popular drugs of abuse among recreational users. Even in small doses heroin can be fatal because of it potency and from other unknown substances that may be within it as it is produced and distributed  illicitly and unregulated. 

 

How is it Used?

Heroin is commonly injected intravenously but can also be insufflated nasally, inhaled, or taken orally. Users often will melt down the substance to then be injected by syringe, a practice that also comes with many health risks like the spread of disease.

 

What does it Look Like?

Heroin can come in a variety of forms most commonly a brown or blackish tar like substance and white powder.

 

What are the Effects?

The effects of heroin or much like other opioids in that it produces the pain relieving euphoric effects but due to the fact that heroin is more often injected the effects are much more rapid and users have described the feeling of a “rush” of euphoria followed by a sleepy wakefulness that can last for hours. Since the effects are so intense and rapid it creates a very high potential for abuse and dependency. When a user begins taking heroin, like other opioids, the body will build a tolerance for the drug.  Users will eventually need to take larger and larger doses to achieve the “rush” or effects that they desire. This can lead to detrimental health effects and possible overdose or death.

 

 

Common Symptoms

  • dry mouth
  • warm flushing of the skin
  • heavy feeling in the arms and legs
  • nausea and vomiting
  • severe itching
  • clouded mental functioning
  • going “on the nod,” a back-and-forth state of being conscious and semiconscious
  • insomnia
  • collapsed veins for people who inject the drug
  • damaged tissue inside the nose for people who sniff or snort it
  • infection of the heart lining and valves
  • abscesses (swollen tissue filled with pus)
  • constipation and stomach cramping
  • liver and kidney disease
  • lung complications, including pneumonia
  • mental disorders such as depression and antisocial personality disorder

 

Common Nicknames

H, Horse, Smack, Chiva, Thunder, Negra 

 

 

Legal Status

Heroin is a Schedule I substance under the U.S. Controlled Substance Act.

KET - Ketamine
What is Ketamine?

Ketamine is a short-acting anesthetic with rapid onset effects that is used in both humans and animals. Sold commercially in the United States in powder and liquid forms, Ketamine, is considered to be a “dissociative” anesthetic because of the feeling of being detached from reality that patients under the influence have described. It has been said to alter a persons perceptions of sight and sound and can cause slight hallucinogenic effects. Ketamine has gained popularity in recreational drug users because of it’s euphoric effects and the detachment from one’s pain or environment. Illegally distributed Ketamine often comes from a legitimate source, in particular, veterinarian clinics.

How is it Used?

Ketamine comes in powder or liquid form and is commonly injected intravenously or intramuscularly, taken by mouth, and by nasal insufflation.

What Does it Look Like?

White or off-white powder or liquid form and is often distributed in glass vials, plastic baggies, capsules, or tin-foil folds.

Common Nicknames

  • Special K
  • Vitamin K
  • K
  • Horse Tranquilizer
  • Cat Tranquilizer
  • Kit Kat
  • Purple

Some common terms that users relate to the “outer body” and “near death” experiences described when taking Ketamine are:

  • K-Hole
  • K-Land
  • K-Trip
  • God
  • Baby Food

What are the Effects?

The effects of Ketamine are felt rapidly and often last anywhere from 30 minutes to 2 hours.  Onset effects are typically slower when ingested orally.  Users have reported flashbacks, or a sudden and vivid memory of a Ketamine “trip”, occuring several weekes after they have used. Drugs with similar effects include, LSD, PCP, GHB, and Rohypnol.

Common Symptoms:

  • Involuntary Rapid Eye Movement
  • Dialated Pupils
  • Salivation
  • Tear Secreation
  • Stiffening of the Muscles
  • Nausea
  • Unconsciousness (Signs of Overdose)
  • Respiratory Depression (Signs of Overdose)

Legal Status:

Schedule III non-narcotic substance under the United States Controlled Substances Act.  Ketamine is currently sold commercially in numerous countries, including the U.S., for medical use.

Kratom
What is Kratom?

Kratom, or Mitragyna speciosa, is a tropical tree within the coffee family, native to South East Asia, and has been used for centuries as a natural remedy for a variety of different ailments.  The leaves of the the tree are often crushed into a fine powder and mixed with water, like a tea, or put into gel capsules and then consumed for the desired effects.

How is it Used?

Typically Kratom leaves are crushed into a fine powder and is consumed by oral ingestion in the form of capsules, tea, or extract.  The leaves can also be chewed.

What are the Effects?

In low doses, Kratom, will often produce stimulant “like” effects, similar to that of caffeine, with symptoms of increased alertness and energy.  When Kratom is taken in high does, often users will experience sedative “like” effects and have been compared similarly to the effects of Opioids.

Common Symptoms:

Nausea

Itching

Sweating

Dry Mouth

Constipation

Increased Urination

Tachycardia

Vomiting

Drowsiness

Loss of Appetite

Anorexia

Weight Loss

Insomnia

Legal Status

Kratom is not controlled under the Federal Controlled Substances Act and remains legal, although some states have banned and criminalized the manufacture, distribution, and possession of Kratom and products containing Kratom.  Kratom is readily available for purchase and has become highly desired among people suffering from drug addiction or those recovering from drug addiction.  Users have claimed that Kratom can help ease the symptoms of Opioid withdrawal, anixiety, and stress. However, there might be potential for abuse because of the “sedative like” effects Kratom can produce. There is an on-going debate over the legality and use of Kratom as a natural alternative to certain pain and anxiety medications. No matter the legal status or fate of Kratom, we are fully aware of the need for testing.

Testing Options

Currently there is no instant diagnostic Point-of-Care test that meets our standards of quality, accuracy, and consistency and while we are working hard to find a solution, we offer Kratom Lab Tests that will provide reliable results we stand by.

LSD
What is LSD?

Lysergic Acid Diethylamide, or better known as LSD, is a potent hallucinogenic that was first sythesized by Albert Halman in 1938 in Switzerland. The drug became popular in the United States during the 1960’s and has been used recreationally, despite it being illegal, since. The onset effects of LSD typically take around 30 minutest to an hour and can last anywhere from 4 - 12 hours depending on the dosage. Users have often described the experience as a “trip” and report mind-altering hallucinations and sensations.

 

How is it Used?

LSD is manufactured in liquid form and then is most commonly disbursed on to “blotter-paper” where then a user will take a small “tab” of the paper covered in the drug sublingually. It is often placed inside the mouth or underneath the tongue, however, LSD can absorb into the pores of the skin.

 

What does it Look Like?

Small square tabs of paper, usually with a cartoon imprint.  It also comes in a clear liquid.

 

What are the Effects?

The onset effects of LSD typically take around 30 minutest to an hour and can last anywhere from 4 - 12 hours depending on the dosage. Users have often described the experience as a “trip” and report mind-altering hallucinations and sensations. Audio and visual senses can be heigthened or distorted leaving users to feel detached from reality.

 

Common Symptoms

  • Dialated pupils
  • Excessive sweating and or chills
  • Paranoia
  • Emotional distress
  • Anxiety
  • Nausea
  • Dizziness
  • Rapid hear rate
  • Inability to perform complex tasks

 

Common Nicknames

Acid, Lucy, Rainbow, Tab, Trips, Superman

 

Legal Status

LSD is a Schedule I substance under the U.S. Controlled Substance Act

NIC - Nicotine
What is Nicotine?

Nicotine is a stimulant commonly found in tobacco products such as cigarettes, cigars, and electronic cigarettes. Nicotine is highly addictive causing depended in users. It is one the most used drugs around the world and has been socially acceptable, though in recent years recent years smoking, one the most common ways to consume nicotine, has decreased due to negative health effects that come with smoking tobacco.

 

 

How is it Used?

Nicotine can be absorbed through  the skin or mucus membranes in the body but is most commonly consumed by  smoking  tobacco products such as cigarettes and cigars. In more recent years smoking has decreased, however, electronic cigarettes, which are tobacco less electronic devises that will vaporize an oil extract containing nicotine, has become increasingly  popular. People can also chew or absorb nicotine through chewing tobacco know as snuff or dip. There are also transdermal patches the can be placed on the skin and nicotine gum that can be chewed typically when someone is trying to quit smoking. Brands like Chantix offer tablets that can be taken orally for smoking cessation as well.

 

What are the Effects?

When nicotine is consumed a brief a sudden surge of endorphins released increasing  the dopamine neurotransmitters  that are associated with the reward circuits in the brain. Compareable to the high of other stimulants such as coffee and cocaine but at a much lesser degree. This plays a part in the dependency that is caused from consuming nicotine and will actually make a user feel as is they are being rewarded for the behavior. Users will feel a calming euphoric sensation that is short in duration leading to habitual use. Cessation of nicotine can cause physical withdrawal symptoms that can last from 2-4 weeks but psychological  dependence can last much longer. Smoking tobacco can cause serious health effects and has been linked to heart disease, strokes, heart attacks, gum disease, and cancer.

 

Common Symptoms

  • Rapid heart rate
  • High blood pressure
  • Irritability 
  • Nasuea
  • Head aches
  • Halitosis 

 

Common Nicknames

Smoke, Butts, Cigs, Dip, Snuff, Chew

 

Legal Status

Currently available commercially for purchase for anyone over the age of 19.

OPI - Opiate
What is an Opiate?

Opiates are naturally derrived from the active ingredients in the opium poppy plant. All opiates fall under the category of opioids since the accepted definition of opioids is now any drug that reacts on the opioid receptors of the brain. Like other opioids, opiates have a high potential for abuse and dependency. Users will build a tolerance to the drug and will need to take larger does in order to achieve the desired effects and to mitigate the common withdrawal symptoms associated with cessation. 

 

How is it Used?

Opiates come in a variety of forms and can be, taken orally, absorbed through the skin, inhaled, insufflated, and injected both intravenously and intramuscularly. 

 

What does it Look Like?

Opiates have many different forms including brown or blackish tar like substance, pills or tablets, clear or yellowish liquid, transdermal patches, sublingual lozenges,  and white or yellowish powder.

 

What are the Effects?

The effects of opiates are similar to that of other opioids. The effects vary in strength and duration depending on the size of dose frequency of use and other pyshcial factors of the user. When injected or taken intravenously onset effects take place almost immediately as posed to digesting it or inhaling it. Opiates will produce a pain reliving euphoric effect which leads to severe psychological and psychical dependence and addiction. More serious health effects and death can be associated with prolong use of opioids if not taken properly under medical supervision.

 

Common Symptoms

  • Noticeable elation/euphoria.
  • Marked sedation/drowsiness.
  • Confusion.
  • Constricted pupils.
  • Slowed breathing.
  • Intermittent nodding off, or loss of consciousness.
  • Constipation

 

Legal Status

Opiates, or most opioids, are Schedule II or Schedule III substances under the U.S. Controlled Substance Act however, Heroin, a synthetic opioid is a Scheduled I substance.

MOP - Morphine
What is Morphine

Morphine is a naturally occurring opiate that is used to treat moderate to severe pain. It is prescribed medically to treat acute and chronic severe pain as well as labor pains during child birth. It, like other opioids, has high potential for abuse and dependency. Morphine acts directly on the central nervous system and is

 

How is it Used ?

Morphine can be administered orally in a tablet and by intravenous and intramuscular injection.

 

What Does it Look Like ?

Small round tablets that vary in color and a clear liquid solution.

 

What are the Effects ?

Like other opioids, Morphine, produces euphoric pain relieving effects and has a high risk for abuse and addiction.  Large doses can be fatal commonly associated with respiratory failure.  Extreme withdrawal symptoms also follow stoppage of prolonged use of Morphine

 

Common Symptoms

  • drowsiness
  • stomach pain and cramps
  • dry mouth
  • headache
  • nervousness
  • mood changes
  • small pupils (black circles in the middle of the eyes
  • difficulty urinating or pain when urinating
  • decreased respiratory function

 

Common Nicknames

Duramorph, Monkey, Miss Emma, Roxinol

 

Legal Status

Morphine is a Schedule II substance under the U.S. Controlled Substance Act

 

OXY - Oxycodone
What is Oxycodone?

Oxycodone is a semi-synthetic narcotic analgesic used to treat moderate to severe pain.  It is a semi-synthetic opioid being  that it is synthesized from thebaine, a naturally occurring alkaloid found in the opium poppy. It has a high potential for abuse due to its’ euphoric pain relieving effects and high risk of addiction and dependency.  Oxycodone has become increasingly popular in recreational users in recent years and has contributed to what is now being called the “Opioid Crisis” of America.

How is it Used?

Oxycodone can only be obtained (legally) by having a prescription from a licensed medical practitioner.  It is manufactured and distributed in extended-released (ER) tablets ranging from 5mg - 80mg and 5mg - 30mg immediate-release tablets (IR).  Common name brands of oxycodone are OxyContin, Roxicodone, Roxicet, Endocet, Percocet, and Percodan. When taken properly in a medical setting or under medical supervision, oxycodone is approved for oral use only in the U.S. It is available in liquid form for intravenous and intramuscular injection in other countries such as the U.K.

What does it look like?

Small round or oval tablets ranging in colors, such as, but not limited to, white, pink, blue, yellow, or green.  OxyContin is one of the most known and widely abused brands of oxycodone and will have the letters “OP” printed on one side and the dosage in milligrams printed on the other, i.e., a 40mg ER OxyContin tablet will appear yellow in color with the letters “OP” on one side and “40” on the other.  Another popular choice among oxycodone users are, Roxicodone 30mg IR tablets, which are typically blue in color. In recreational use, it is common for a user to crush the tablet into a powder to than either insufflate nasally or heat the powder to a liquid to then be injected intravenously.  The tablets can also be smoked, or “free-based”, off of aluminum foil and be used as an inhalant.

What are the Effects?

When taken properly an extended-release tablet will usually produce onset effects within 30 minutes to 1 hour and can last anywhere from 4 - 12 hours gradually “releasing” the dose over an “extended” period of time. The immediate-release tablets will have shorter acting effects last from 2 - 4 hours but “release” the entire dose all at once or “immediate(ly)”. Oxycodone has been said to produce euphoric pain relieving effects that have helped many improve quality of life, but has a high risk of dependency and can also be fatal at high doses. Users are often encouraged to be weened off oxycodone, due to the withdrawal symptoms that can follow abrupt stopage

 

Common Symptoms

  • Miosis or pin pointed pupils
  • Shallow Breathing
  • Decreased Respiratory Function
  • Itching
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Constipation
  • Dizziness
  • Coma
  • Death

Common Nicknames

Oxy’s, Roxy’s,  Blues, Greens, Percs, Vics, Hillbilly Heroin

Legal Status

Schedule II substance under the U.S. Controlled Substance Act.

PCP - Phencyclidine
What is PCP ?

 

How is it Used?

What does it Look Like?

What are the Effects?

Common Symptoms

Common Nicknames

Legal Status

PPX - Propoxyphen
What is an Propoxyphene?

Propoxyphene is a narcotic pain relieving opioid that is used to alleviate mild to moderate pain in. It can also be used as cough suppressant and to combat fever. When used in it’s purest form propoxyphene has also been administered to subdue common psychical withdrawal symptoms from stronger opioids. It is weaker than opioids such as, morphine, oxycodone, and heroin and only reacts partially to opioid receptors in the brain. This makes propoxyphene less psychologically addictive. It has been discounted commercially in U.S. markets due to adverse health effects.

How is it Used?

Commonly taken orally in tablet form.

What does it Look Like?

Propoxyphene is an orderless, bitter tasting, fine white crystal powder. It is commonly prescribed in a small football shaped tablet varying in size and color

What are the Effects?

 

Common Symptoms

Common Nicknames

Legal Status

Testing Options

Rohyphnol
What is Royphonol ?

Royphonol is a powerful benzodiazpine and acts as a central nervous system depressant. It has become widely known as the  “date rape” because it has been used to sedate potential victims. In a medical setting, it has been used to treat insomnia  and a precursor to anesthesia in some countries outside of the U.S.

 

How is it Used?

Royphonol is commonly taken orally in tablet form but has also been used to sedate potential rape or sexual assault victims by dissolving the tablet in liquid. It has been known to be insufflated nasally.

 

What does it Look Like?

Small white tablet. Royphonol also comes in long oblong shaped tablet that is green in color and contain traces of blue dye inside of them. This was manufactured to combat potential sexual assaults or other crimes related to some one being unknowingly dosed with the drug.  It is otherwise orderless and tasteless leaving it difficult to know when consumed. 

 

What are the Effects?

Royphonol produces powerful sedative and hypnotic muscle relaxant effects that can cause amnesia and impair judgment and motor function.

 

Common Symptoms

  • Drowsiness
  • Dizziness
  • Disorientation
  • Sedation
  • Decreased motor function
  • Decreased anxiety
  • Amnesia
  • Respiratory depression
  • Impaired Judgment

 

Common Nicknames

Roofies, Mexican Valium, Forget me pill, R2, Wolfies, Roofinol, Date rape drug, Roach

 

Legal Status

Royphonol is a Schedule IV controlled substance under the U.S. Controlled Substance Act.

K2 SPICE - Synthetic Marijuana
What is an K2 Spice?

How is it Used?

What does it Look Like?

What are the Effects?

Common Symptoms

Common Nicknames

Legal Status

TCA - Tricylic Antidepressants
What is an Opiate?

How is it Used?

What does it Look Like?

What are the Effects?

Common Symptoms

Common Nicknames

Legal Status

Testing Options

Cross Reactions

Search by Drug, Abbrieviation, Brand Name, or Generic Names to find out potential cross reactions between substances…

CUT-OFF LEVELS & DETECTION TIMES

DRUG CUT-OFF  WOD Certification
Alcohol (ETG) 300, 500ng/mL Up to 80 hrs. Forensic Use Only
Amphetamines (AMP) 1000ng/mL 2 hr. - 4 Days FDA CLIA-Waived (500, 1000)
Bariturates (BAR) 300ng/mL 2 hr. - 7 Days FDA CLIA-Waived (300)
Bath Salts (MDPV) 1000 24 - 48 hr. Varies on Dosage Forensic Use Only
Benzodiazepines (BZO) 300, 200ng/mL 2 hr. - 7 Days FDA CLIA-Waived (300)
Buprenorphine (BUP) 10ng/mL 1 - 3 Days FDA CLIA-Waived
Cocaine (COC) 150ng/mL 1 hr. - 4 Days FDA CLIA-Waived 
Ecstacy (MDMA) 500ng/mL 2 hr. - 4 Days FDA CLIA-Waived 
Fentanyl (FEN) 300ng/mL 2 hr. - 4 Days Forensic Use Only
Gabapentin (GAB) Forensic Use Only
Heroin (6-MAM) 10ng/mL 24 hr. Forensic Use Only
Marijuana (THC) 50, 25ng/mL 2 hr. - 40 Days FDA CLIA-Waived (50)
Methadone (MTD) 200, 300ng/mL 1 hr. - 3 Days FDA CLIA-Waived
Methadone Metabolite (EDDP) 100, 300ng/mL 1 hr. - 3 Days FDA CLIA-Waived (100)
Methamphetamines (mAMP) 300, 500 - 1000ng/mL 2 hr. - 4 Days FDA CLIA-Waived (500, 1000)
Morphine (MOP) 100, 200, 300ng/mL 2 hr. - 4 Days FDA CLIA-Waived (300)
Opiates (OPI) 2000ng/mL 2 hr. - 4 Days FDA CLIA-Waived
Oxycodone (OXY) 100ng/mL 2 hr. - 4 Days FDA CLIA-Waived
Phencyclidine (PCP) 25ng/mL 4 hrs. - 14 Days FDA CLIA-Waived
Propoxyphene (PPX) 300ng/mL 1 hr. - 3 Days FDA CLIA-Waived
Synthetic Marijuana (K2) 25, 50ng/mL Up to 72 hrs. Forensic Use Only
Tramadol (TRA) 100, 200ng/mL 1 hr. - 2 Days Forensic Use Only
Tricyclic Antidepressants (TCA) 1000ng/mL 2-10 Days FDA CLIA-Waived

 

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